International English Olympiad Forum By SOF Olympiad Trainer - Page 20

User Forum

Subject :IEO    Class : Class 7

Post Your Answer

Subject :IEO    Class : Class 7

Post Your Answer

Subject :IEO    Class : Class 7

Post Your Answer

Subject :IEO    Class : Class 6

Ans 1:

Class : Class 6
It could also be 'a pity'

Post Your Answer

Subject :IEO    Class : Class 9

Post Your Answer

Subject :IEO    Class : Class 8

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
A social enterprise is turning old loyalty cards (similar to credit cards) into emergency bee feeders. Bees can find themselves running out of energy in urban areas, where they become exhausted searching for nectar in the concrete jungle. This is because there are not enough flowers for bees to feed from the pollen on.
A Norwich-based social enterprise called 'Bee Saviour Behaviour' aims to throw the weary pollinators a lifeline, by turning old store cards into revival kits. Unwanted cards are embossed to incorporate three small wells, each of which contains a sugar solution that can be fed to struggling bees. The pouches are covered with a peelable, foil-backed paper sticker. The cards fit into wallets and can be sent back to the company to be refilled.
"Urban environments are often changing, and bees run out of fuel very quickly," said Dan Harris, founder of Bee Saviour Behaviour. "It is common for them to come unstuck. We wanted to help people understand there are simple things they can do to promote biodiversity."
Buglife, a charity that supports the conservation of insects, advises people who find exhausted bees to take them to some flowers and only use sugar solution as a last resort. Harris agrees, acknowledges that his cards will not single-handedly reverse bees' fortunes. But he does hope they will spark a wider conversation about the issues facing pollinators, whose numbers are dwindling due to a range of factors, including habitat loss, climate change and the use of insecticides.
"The card in many ways is the start of the journey," Harris said. "We want to use it as a seed to plant curiosity in people and help them understand that there are simple things they can do to promote biodiversity, which is the bigger picture." Allowing lawns to grow, sowing beefriendly plants, urging your council to adopt pollinator-friendly measures and avoiding pesticides are some of the steps people can take, according to Friends of the Earth.
There is certainly a huge appetite among members of the public to protect pollinators. A crowdfunding campaign to fund the production of the cards raised more than £27,000 in a month. "It blew my mind," said Harris. "We didn't expect to have so many supporters in so many cities." The social entrepreneur now hopes to establish communities of donors up and down the country to champion bees in their local area. "We are going to model that here in Norwich," he said. "We will work with the local authority, local groups and all the people who invested in the campaign to make Norwich a more beefriendly city. It's very exciting."

What does the word 'donor' mean in the final paragraph?

ABacker
BUser
CCustomer
DStaff


Post Your Answer

Subject :IEO    Class : Class 8

Post Your Answer

Subject :IEO    Class : Class 5

Post Your Answer

Subject :IEO    Class : Class 5

Ans 1:

Class : Class 5
because it is showing the correct ans is b

Post Your Answer

Subject :IEO    Class : Class 6

Post Your Answer