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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 9

Read the following passages and answer the questions that follow :
One day a farmer’s donkey fell down into a well. The animal cried piteously for hours as the farmer tried to figure out what to do.
Finally, he decided since the animal was old, and the well needed to be covered up anyway, it just wasn’t worth it to retrieve the donkey. So, the farmer invited all his neighbours to come over and help him. They all grabbed shovels, and began to shovel dirt into the well.
All the other farm animals were very upset about this, because the donkey was their friend. But they discovered there was nothing they could do to help him. At first, when the donkey realised what was happening, he cried horribly. Then, to everyone’s amazement, he quieted down. A few shovel loads later, the farmer finally looked down the well, and was astonished at what he saw.
With every shovel of dirt that hit his back, the donkey was doing something amazing. He would shake it off, and take a step up on the dirt as it piled up. As the farmer’s neighbours continued to shovel dirt on top of the animal, he would shake it off and take a step up. Pretty soon, everyone was amazed as the donkey stepped up over the edge of the well, and trotted off!
Moral : Life is going to shovel dirt on you, all kinds of dirt. But each trouble can be a stepping stone. What happens to you isn’t nearly as how you react to it. We can get out of the deepest wells just by not giving up!
The other farm animals were upset because _________.

A the donkey was their friend
B they were unable to do anything
C both A and B
D none of the above


The animals were upset that their friend, the donkey was about to die, not for they could not do anything.

Ans 1:

Class : Class 9
c

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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 5

READ THE PASSAGE AND ANSEWER THE QUESTION
The Land of the Vikings
(From 'Peeps at many lands: Norway' by A. F. Mockler-Ferryman)
Who has not heard of the Vikings—the dauntless sea-rovers, who in the days of long ago were the dread of Northern Europe? We English should know something of them, for Viking blood flowed in the veins of many of our ancestors. And these fierce fighting men came in their ships across the North Sea from Norway on more than one occasion to invade England. But they came once too often, and were thoroughly defeated at the Battle of Stamford Bridge, when, as will be remembered, Harald the Hard, King of Norway, was killed in attempting to turn his namesake, King Harold of England, off his throne.
Norwegian historians, however, do not say very much about this particular invasion. They prefer to dwell on the great deeds of another King Harald, who was called "Fairhair," and who began his reign some two hundred years earlier. This Harald was only a boy of ten years of age when he came to the throne, but he determined to increase the size of his kingdom, which was then but a small one, so he trained his men to fight, built grand new ships, and then began his conquests. Norway was at that time divided up into a number of districts or small kingdoms, each of which was ruled over by an Earl or petty King, and it was these rulers whom Harald set to work to subdue. He intended to make one united kingdom of all Norway, and he eventually succeeded in doing so. But he had many a hard fight; and if the Sagas, as the historical records of the North are called, speak truly, he fought almost continuously during twelve long years before he had accomplished his task, and even then he was only just twenty-one years of age.
They say that he did all these wonderful things because a girl, named Gyda, whom he wanted to marry, refused to have anything to say to him until he had made himself King of a really big kingdom. He made a vow that he would not comb or cut his hair until he had conquered the whole country. He led his men to victory after victory, and at length fought his last great battle at Hafrsfjord (to the south of Stavanger). The sea-fight was desperate and long, but Harald's fleet succeeded in overpowering that of the enemy, and Sulki, King of Rogaland, as well as Erik, King of Hardanger, were slain. Then Harald cut and dressed his hair, the skalds composed poems in honour of the event, and for ever after he was known as Fairhair. He was truly a great Viking, and he did not rest content with the conquest of Norway alone; for he brought his ships across the North Sea and conquered the Isle of Man, the Hebrides, the Shetlands, and the Orkneys, and he lived to the age of eighty-three.

In his campaign to win a large kingdom, Harald 'Fairhair'

A led his men through many triumphs
B took his men through several victories and defeats
C slew the King of Rogaland, as well as Erik, King of Hardanger
D to expire at a specific age


Ans 1:

Class : Class 10
A

Ans 2:

Class : Class 5
B

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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 5

READ THE PASSAGE AND ANSEWER THE QUESTION
The Land of the Vikings
(From 'Peeps at many lands: Norway' by A. F. Mockler-Ferryman)
Who has not heard of the Vikings—the dauntless sea-rovers, who in the days of long ago were the dread of Northern Europe? We English should know something of them, for Viking blood flowed in the veins of many of our ancestors. And these fierce fighting men came in their ships across the North Sea from Norway on more than one occasion to invade England. But they came once too often, and were thoroughly defeated at the Battle of Stamford Bridge, when, as will be remembered, Harald the Hard, King of Norway, was killed in attempting to turn his namesake, King Harold of England, off his throne.
Norwegian historians, however, do not say very much about this particular invasion. They prefer to dwell on the great deeds of another King Harald, who was called "Fairhair," and who began his reign some two hundred years earlier. This Harald was only a boy of ten years of age when he came to the throne, but he determined to increase the size of his kingdom, which was then but a small one, so he trained his men to fight, built grand new ships, and then began his conquests. Norway was at that time divided up into a number of districts or small kingdoms, each of which was ruled over by an Earl or petty King, and it was these rulers whom Harald set to work to subdue. He intended to make one united kingdom of all Norway, and he eventually succeeded in doing so. But he had many a hard fight; and if the Sagas, as the historical records of the North are called, speak truly, he fought almost continuously during twelve long years before he had accomplished his task, and even then he was only just twenty-one years of age.
They say that he did all these wonderful things because a girl, named Gyda, whom he wanted to marry, refused to have anything to say to him until he had made himself King of a really big kingdom. He made a vow that he would not comb or cut his hair until he had conquered the whole country. He led his men to victory after victory, and at length fought his last great battle at Hafrsfjord (to the south of Stavanger). The sea-fight was desperate and long, but Harald's fleet succeeded in overpowering that of the enemy, and Sulki, King of Rogaland, as well as Erik, King of Hardanger, were slain. Then Harald cut and dressed his hair, the skalds composed poems in honour of the event, and for ever after he was known as Fairhair. He was truly a great Viking, and he did not rest content with the conquest of Norway alone; for he brought his ships across the North Sea and conquered the Isle of Man, the Hebrides, the Shetlands, and the Orkneys, and he lived to the age of eighty-three.

The Vikings came to England'once too often'. In this passage 'once too often' means.

A the Vikings invaded England many times
B the Vikings came too often to England and they ran out of supplies
C the Vikings caused trouble for themselves by invading England repeatedly
D the locals thought the Vikings came too often


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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 5

READ THE PASSAGE AND ANSEWER THE QUESTION
The Land of the Vikings
(From 'Peeps at many lands: Norway' by A. F. Mockler-Ferryman)
Who has not heard of the Vikings—the dauntless sea-rovers, who in the days of long ago were the dread of Northern Europe? We English should know something of them, for Viking blood flowed in the veins of many of our ancestors. And these fierce fighting men came in their ships across the North Sea from Norway on more than one occasion to invade England. But they came once too often, and were thoroughly defeated at the Battle of Stamford Bridge, when, as will be remembered, Harald the Hard, King of Norway, was killed in attempting to turn his namesake, King Harold of England, off his throne.
Norwegian historians, however, do not say very much about this particular invasion. They prefer to dwell on the great deeds of another King Harald, who was called "Fairhair," and who began his reign some two hundred years earlier. This Harald was only a boy of ten years of age when he came to the throne, but he determined to increase the size of his kingdom, which was then but a small one, so he trained his men to fight, built grand new ships, and then began his conquests. Norway was at that time divided up into a number of districts or small kingdoms, each of which was ruled over by an Earl or petty King, and it was these rulers whom Harald set to work to subdue. He intended to make one united kingdom of all Norway, and he eventually succeeded in doing so. But he had many a hard fight; and if the Sagas, as the historical records of the North are called, speak truly, he fought almost continuously during twelve long years before he had accomplished his task, and even then he was only just twenty-one years of age.
They say that he did all these wonderful things because a girl, named Gyda, whom he wanted to marry, refused to have anything to say to him until he had made himself King of a really big kingdom. He made a vow that he would not comb or cut his hair until he had conquered the whole country. He led his men to victory after victory, and at length fought his last great battle at Hafrsfjord (to the south of Stavanger). The sea-fight was desperate and long, but Harald's fleet succeeded in overpowering that of the enemy, and Sulki, King of Rogaland, as well as Erik, King of Hardanger, were slain. Then Harald cut and dressed his hair, the skalds composed poems in honour of the event, and for ever after he was known as Fairhair. He was truly a great Viking, and he did not rest content with the conquest of Norway alone; for he brought his ships across the North Sea and conquered the Isle of Man, the Hebrides, the Shetlands, and the Orkneys, and he lived to the age of eighty-three.

King Harald 'Fairhair' fought for twelve years before he accomplishedhis task. In the passage, the 'task' refers to Harald's:

A fight to win the heart of Gyda
B resolve to unite the fragmented Norwegian kingdoms under him
C dream to conquer the Isle of Man, the Hebrides, the Shetlands, and the Orkneys.
D desire to build grand new ships and use this navy for conquests


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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 5

READ THE PASSAGE AND ANSEWER THE QUESTION
The Land of the Vikings
(From 'Peeps at many lands: Norway' by A. F. Mockler-Ferryman)
Who has not heard of the Vikings—the dauntless sea-rovers, who in the days of long ago were the dread of Northern Europe? We English should know something of them, for Viking blood flowed in the veins of many of our ancestors. And these fierce fighting men came in their ships across the North Sea from Norway on more than one occasion to invade England. But they came once too often, and were thoroughly defeated at the Battle of Stamford Bridge, when, as will be remembered, Harald the Hard, King of Norway, was killed in attempting to turn his namesake, King Harold of England, off his throne.
Norwegian historians, however, do not say very much about this particular invasion. They prefer to dwell on the great deeds of another King Harald, who was called "Fairhair," and who began his reign some two hundred years earlier. This Harald was only a boy of ten years of age when he came to the throne, but he determined to increase the size of his kingdom, which was then but a small one, so he trained his men to fight, built grand new ships, and then began his conquests. Norway was at that time divided up into a number of districts or small kingdoms, each of which was ruled over by an Earl or petty King, and it was these rulers whom Harald set to work to subdue. He intended to make one united kingdom of all Norway, and he eventually succeeded in doing so. But he had many a hard fight; and if the Sagas, as the historical records of the North are called, speak truly, he fought almost continuously during twelve long years before he had accomplished his task, and even then he was only just twenty-one years of age.
They say that he did all these wonderful things because a girl, named Gyda, whom he wanted to marry, refused to have anything to say to him until he had made himself King of a really big kingdom. He made a vow that he would not comb or cut his hair until he had conquered the whole country. He led his men to victory after victory, and at length fought his last great battle at Hafrsfjord (to the south of Stavanger). The sea-fight was desperate and long, but Harald's fleet succeeded in overpowering that of the enemy, and Sulki, King of Rogaland, as well as Erik, King of Hardanger, were slain. Then Harald cut and dressed his hair, the skalds composed poems in honour of the event, and for ever after he was known as Fairhair. He was truly a great Viking, and he did not rest content with the conquest of Norway alone; for he brought his ships across the North Sea and conquered the Isle of Man, the Hebrides, the Shetlands, and the Orkneys, and he lived to the age of eighty-three.

In the text, the word 'dauntless' means:

A stubborn and frightful
B vulnerable and fearing
C determined and fearless
D persevering and fearful


Ans 1:

Class : Class 5
C - determined and fearless

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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 9

Ans 1:

Class : Class 9
b is the answer

Ans 2:

Class : Class 9
B

Ans 3:

Class : Class 9
Answer is C

Ans 4:

Class : Class 9
The correct answer is option b not d

Ans 5:

Class : Class 9

Ans 6:

Class : Class 9
It should be B not D

Ans 7:

Class : Class 9
Me too b is the correct answer but here it shows d

Ans 8:

Class : Class 9

Ans 9:

Class : Class 10
Correct Answer is 2

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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 5

Ans 1:

Class : Class 9
According to me the answer is d) utter.

Ans 2:

Class : Class 9
According to me the answer is d) utter.

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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 6

Ans 1:

Class : Class 8
The answer is D option. There would be no passive voice because this sentence cannot be at all converted in a passive voice. Hope this helps you. #riya

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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 3

Ans 1:

Class : Class 3
The answer is but. I actually mean it

Ans 2:

Class : Class 4
There are two options-'C' and 'D'.

Ans 3:

Class : Class 4

Ans 4:

Class : Class 6

Ans 5:

Class : Class 5
c and d can be the correct

Ans 6:

Class : Class 8
The correct answer is D.

Ans 7:

Class : Class 3

Ans 8:

Class : Class 6
got it so but cannot be answer

Ans 9:

Class : Class 6

Ans 10:

Class : Class 5
c and d both can be the answer

Ans 11:

Class : Class 4

Ans 12:

Class : Class 3
Its answer is but

Ans 13:

Class : Class 5
both C and D seems to be correctby - Samvita Patil from National Hill View Public school, class 3B

Ans 14:

Class : Class 3
Lakshya singh tomar from DPS NOIDA class- 3d

Ans 15:

Class : Class 3
C

Ans 16:

Class : Class 6
no D is answer meaning still The weaver was poor still he was happy now replace still with yet read it with yet The weaver was poor yet he was happy

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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 3

Ans 1:

Class : Class 7

Ans 2:

Class : Class 1

Ans 3: (Master Answer)

Class : Class 1
The correct answer is B.

Ans 4:

Class : Class 6
a

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