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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 7

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.

The Great White Shark is the largest predatory shark, and is probably the most well-known and feared shark. The Great White Shark is grey or bluish above and white below. The largest Great White Sharks can reach lengths of 22 feet and weigh up to 5,000 pounds. Most are between 13 and 16 feet and weigh 1,500-2,400 pounds. The Great White Shark has big teeth, which are positioned in rows and serrated. When the Great White Shark attacks, it bites its prey and shakes it head back and forth. The serrated teeth act as a saw and literally tear the victim apart.

The Great White Shark generally feeds on fish, seals, dolphins, porpoises, otters, and turtles. It is believed to locate its prey by electrosense and by smell. Great White Sharks have special pores called Ampullae of Lorenzini, which enable them to detect the electromagnetic fields radiated by moving organisms. Great White Sharks can detect voltage as small as one half billionth of a volt.Great White Sharks use many different hunting techniques depending on the prey.

Most of the time, the shark will remain still underwater before attacking its prey from underneath. In case of hunting some kinds of seals, the impact of the shark is so powerful that it knocks both the shark and the seal clear out of the water. With larger prey such as elephant seals, the shark will simply take a huge bite out of it and wait for it to bleed to death.

Great White Sharks are most commonly found throughout the world’s sub-arctic coastal waters, though they are likely to spend most of their time in the open ocean. They are also found in the waters of the coast of South Africa, Australia, California and Mexica. They generally prefer water between 54 and 75 degrees fahrenheit.

How does the Great White Shark locate its prey?

ABy electrosense
BBy smell
COnly 'A'
DBoth 'A' and 'B'


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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 7

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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 7

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Class : Class 7

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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 2

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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 7

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
In the 19th century a series of discoveries were made across Europe, in Belgium, Gibraltar, Germany and Croatia. Interestingly, it was the site of the third discovery that lends its name to what was found. Named after the Neander valley in Germany, scientists had uncovered the first evidence of Neanderthal man. Since then, their remains have been found across Western and Central Europe, in the Levant and in regions of Northern and Western Asia. No remains have been found in Africa to date. At their peak, it is thought that the population of Neanderthals may have reached 70,000.
Today, Neanderthals are classed as a species or subspecies of human. They are closely related to us and share 99.7% of our DNA. We also lived alongside each other in Europe for a few thousand years. However, they became extinct about 40,000 years ago, and modern humans did not. There are a number of theories that seek to explain why the Neanderthals disappeared, but we cannot be certain of the exact reason. One scenario assumes that Neanderthals and modern humans were separate species and the arrival of humans, together with climate change, meant that they were gradually replaced.
Some argue that this interaction between the two species may have been violent. Another scenario places Neanderthals as a subspecies of human that interbred with us and disappeared through being absorbed into the population. The exact nature of the relationship between Neanderthals and modern humans has not been scientifically proven and is contentious. There are also extinction theories that put the blame on an extreme volcanic event. We do know that about 55,000 years ago the climate started to fluctuate between extreme cold and milder conditions. Rapid fluctuations, occurring within a few decades, may have made it difficult for Neanderthals to adapt and survive.

What is the significance of the discovery in Germany?

ANeanderthals were named after a place there.
BNeanderthals became extinct there.
CThey reached 70,000 mark in Germany.
DIt was the first time Neanderthals were discovered outside Gibraltar.


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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 7

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
The current 'biggest' threat to climbers on the world's tallest peak, the former head of the Nepal Mountaineering Association said, is the staggering amount of human waste being left on its slopes with some estimates putting that number at more than 8,500 kilos for this season alone.
The biggest problem and concern now on Everest is human. It is impossible to know exactly how much litter is spread across Everest because it only becomes visible when the snow melts. But at Camp 2, two levels higher than Base Camp, Sherpas who worked on the government's cleanup drive this spring believe around 8,500 kilos of human waste was left there during this year's climbing season. The clean-up took 3 weeks, and the Sherpas were continually going up and down the mountain with sacks.
Melting conditions at Camp 2 create an odour that is sickening to climbers, and the waste will eventually contaminate water sources below and become a health hazard, Tshering warns. "During our expedition to Camp 2, eight of our 10 Sherpas got stomach illness from bad water at Camp 2," said John All, a professor of environmental science at Western Washington University who visited Everest on a research expedition.
Ang Dorjee, who heads the independent Everest Pollution Control Committee, has demanded that the Nepal government institute some rules. The problem is there are no regulations on how to dispose of the human waste. Some climbers use biodegradable bags that have enzymes, which decompose human waste but most of them don't.
Instead of using the makeshift toilets, many climbers dig a hole in the snow, letting the waste fall into small crevasses. However, rising temperatures have thinned the glacier, leaving fewer and smaller crevasses. The overflowing waste then spills downhill towards Base Camp and even communities below the mountain.
Local people living at the Base Camp use melted snow for drinking water -- and for them, the human excrement poses a health risk. Tshering and other mountaineers say the government should mandate the use of biodegradable bags for human waste. The bags are expensive and have to be imported from the United States.

How many Sherpas got ill?

A8
B2
C3
D10


Ans 1:

Class : Class 7
The answer is (d) as i think but the app says its (a)

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