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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 1

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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 7

Read the passage and answer the question that follow.

Some virus experts might not consider viruses to be alive. Yet viruses can reproduce. To do so, they hijack the cells of a host. They borrow the "machinery" in the host's cells to copy the virus' genetic code. Those host cells may spit out hundreds or thousands - even millions - of copies of the original virus. These new viruses then go on to infect more cells. Maybe the host will also sneeze out the viruses or otherwise release some to infect other potential hosts. And those hosts might be anything from people or plants to bacteria.
But each time a virus is copied, there's some risk the host's cell will make one or more errors in the genetic code of that virus. These are known as mutations. Each new one alters the genetic blueprint of the virus a bit. Mutant viruses are known as variants of the original.
Many mutations won't affect how a virus works. Some might be bad for the virus. Others might improve how well the virus can infect a cell, or help the virus evade its host's immune system. A mutation might even allow the virus to resist the effects of some therapy. Scientists refer to such new-and-improved variants as strains.
And although coronavirus variants made news throughout much of the COVID-19 pandemic, any virus runs the risk of spawning new variants through mutation.
Indeed, mutations are one basis of evolution. Mutationsthat don't benefit an organism (or virus), often die out. But those that make an organism more fit - better adapted to its environment - tend to become more dominant.
Scientists refer to some new versions of the coronavirus as "variants of concern". Compared to the original virus, these variants might infect or spread between people more easily, respond less well to treatments or impair how well vaccines work against the virus. A more serious class of viruses are so-called "variants of high consequence".
Treatments or precautions work far less well against these viruses than they had against earlier forms of the virus. For instance, the new variants might resist current vaccines. They may not show up well in current tests. They might even ause more severe disease.


Choose the best title or heading for the passage.

AVirus-Variants and Strains
BVirus Mutations
CCovid-19 Pandemic
DVariants of Concern


Why not B?

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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 9

Ans 1:

Class : Class 9
C

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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 9

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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 5

Read the passage and answer the question that follow.
Long, long ago, the mighty Elephant had no trunk. His nose was short, and only as big as a boot! But the Elephant's child was very curious and always asked silly questions. One fine morning the curious baby Elephant asked, "What does the Crocodile have for dinner?" All together everybody yelled, "HUSH!" in a dreadful tone, and they shushed and shooed him away angrily. But the baby Elephant did not understand why. He was still curious!
Then the baby Elephant came upon the magnificent Kolokolo bird and he sighed, "My family has shushed and shooed me away, but I still want to know what the Crocodile eats for dinner!" The Kolokolo bird answered, sadly, "Go to the banks of the great green river if you want to find out." After a long and tiresome search, the baby Elephant found the Crocodile by the river bank. "I have been looking for you, Mr. Crocodile!" he said with excitement, "Will you please tell me what you have for dinner?" The Crocodile grinned wide, and he said, "Come closer, baby Elephant, I'll whisper it to you." The baby Elephant bent his head down to the Crocodile's large, toothy mouth.
"I think," growled the Crocodile, "Today I will begin with a baby Elephant!" And suddenly the Crocodile caught him by his little nose. The baby Elephant cried out through his pinched nose, "Led go! You're hurding be!" Stubbornly, he sat back and began to pull as hard as he could. As he pulled, and went back, his nose began to stretch! They both pulled and pulled until the baby Elephant's nose was almost five feet long. Finally the Crocodile let go of his nose with a plop. The poor baby Elephant was left with a very sore and very long nose! At first, all the animals made fun of his great, ugly nose. But then he found many uses for it. He could pick fruit from high treetops, brush away flies, and even breathe when he was underwater! And that is how the Elephant got his trunk.

Who answered the baby Elephant’s query about the Crocodile?

AAll animals
BHis family
CCrocodile
DKolokolo bird


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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 9

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.
People view art differently. Every individual will have a different opinion on a given piece and this is subjective, especially if you have no prior knowledge of the message the artist is intending to get across. Traditional pieces of art, in particular paintings and sculptures, can be appreciated for the level of skill employed to create them. However, whether or not an individual likes a piece of art, will be based on something entirely different that cannot be easily defined. There maybe a combination of colours that is pleasing to the viewer, or an image may evoke a particular emotion in them based on their past experiences. Each viewer may look at a piece of art and understand it entirely differently, and this could be what makes certain pieces so inherently beautiful.
When it comes to painted portraits, it is interesting to think about what makes them resemble the subject. It is thought that this can lie in how the eyes have been captured by the artist. And this does not need to be detailed. If you look at the work of Indian artist Jamini Roy, who painted a painting called ‘Three Pujarins’, here he depicts three priestesses with eyes that have been painted as simple almond shapes. However, the positioning of the eyes’ pupil gives them all a distinct expression. What that expression is, is again open to the interpretation of the person looking at the painting.
Individuals who look at pieces of art for the first time are also likely to be influenced by its setting, their setting and what they have seen and done immediately before looking at them. For example, if a person is in a gallery looking at lots of black and white drawings, and then suddenly comes across a wildly colourful piece, the latter is likely to create a more emotive response in the observer, than if this picture were surrounded by other, bright, colour strewn images. Again, if the observer was in a bad mood, this could transpose their opinion of a particular piece of art. On a different day, just after getting good grades at school and having won a cricket match, their thoughts on the same image could be entirely different.
So, when looking at visual art, whatever form of art this maybe, contemporary, ancient, abstract or photographic, it can be useful to first consider its setting and your own, before deciding if you like it or not.

What is interesting about portraits?

AIt shows depiction of human tribes.
BThey can capture human emotion.
CThe eyes are important.
DThe subject of the portrait is generally of most interest.


ok first of all some portraits dont even have eyes

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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 5

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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 9

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Subject :IEO    Class : Class 5

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