In Focus

Lal-Bahadur-Shastri

WHAT IS CHILDREN'S DAY and WHY DO WE CELEBRATE IT?

"Children should always be carefully and lovingly nurtured, as they are the future of the nation and the citizens of tomorrow." said Jawaharlal Nehru, lovingly known as 'Chacha Nehru'.

Children's Day is a day recognized to celebrate children. The day is celebrated on various dates in different countries.

On the second Sunday of June in 1857, Reverend Dr. Charles Leonard, pastor of the Universalist Church of the Redeemer in Chelsea, Massachusetts: Leonard began Children's day and held a special service dedicated to, and for the children. Leonard named the day Rose Day, though it was later named Flower Sunday, and then Children's Day.

23 April was officially declared as Children's day and a national holiday in 1929 by the Republic of Turkey and since then their government and the newspapers declared it as the day for children.

1 June in many countries is observed as the International Day for Protection of Children and as Children's Day since 1950.

We in India celebrate Children's Day on 14 November every year on the birth anniversary of Jawaharlal Nehru, who was the first Prime Minister of India. Children's Day is celebrated across India to increase awareness of the rights, care and education of children. On this day, many educational and motivational programs are held across India, by and for children.

Even though Children's Day is celebrated globally by most of the countries in the world on 1st June (almost 50 countries), Universal Children's Day takes place annually on 20 November. It was established to encourage all countries to institute a day, firstly to promote mutual exchange and understanding among children and secondly to initiate action to benefit and promote the welfare of the world's children.

Universal Children's Day is not just a day to celebrate children for who they are, but to bring awareness towards children around the globe that have experienced violence in forms of abuse, exploitation and discrimination.

In Story

Buddha

A COIN A DAY

Som Dutta wanted his son, Varun Dutta to grow up into a fine, sensible and thoughtful young man. The boy looked up to his father and the father always looked out for an interesting way of 'educating' his son.

"Baba, baba, the great fair of Basant will be held for three days outside the village. All my friends will go and so shall I," Varun's voice was full of excitement as he came running into the house.

"Why not, Varun? You must go with your friends on all the three days. You are old enough now to take care of yourself. Also, for each day of the fair, I shall give you a coin to spend. Remember two things, firstly you don’t have to save anything from the coin you get for the day and secondly you must spend your coin well. We shall discuss how well you spent your money at the end of the fair."

Soon the fair was over and once again the father and son sat together.

"So how did you spend your money each day?"

"Oh, each day was different, father. The first day I ate to my heart's content with my money. The food was tasty but the 'catapult' that I bought was of a very poor quality. It was so disappointing. The second day I was rather unlucky. I lost the coin while I was walking with my friends. I searched my pockets but it was shocking to think how it just slipped and fell somewhere. The third day, I was rather careful. I kept it very carefully and spent it well. In fact, I also bought two little gifts, one for you and one for mother. The last coin was rather well spent."

Som Dutta listened carefully. "He had a gentle smile on his face as he said," My dear son, God Almighty, our father, gives us all a coin a day. Each day is given to us as a coin to be spend in this great fair of the world. We must spend our each day as carefully and as sensibly as a child would spend a coin in a fair. See that you don't waste it on meaningless and worthless activities. Make sure that you do something worthwhile with it. Just as buying a gift for me gave you happiness, spend a little bit of your time for others too. Don’t be selfish. Keep others in mind while you spend your day. This would make your life more meaningful and happy.

Source: The Joy Of Living

UNSUNG HEROS

I must help

BE THE CHANGE YOU WANT TO SEE IN THE WORLD!

"As human beings, our greatness lies not so much in being able to remake the world - that is the myth of the atomic age - as in being able to remake ourselves" said Mahatma Gandhi.

Diwali is just around the corner and preparations have already begun. As being the biggest festival of India, Diwali brings with itself an unmatchable excitement and celebratory spirit.

However, in the recent years, extravagant celebrations have not only put a great strain on the environment, but have also put people's health at stake. Burning crackers may seem fun, but as responsible citizens it's our duty to protect our environment from dangerously rising pollution level. It is not important to start big, forget about the big change and start with a tiny habit. This small start to change the world will have an impact greater than you think.

It is rightly said "You have to be the change that you want to see in the world."

You can start small by:

  • Taking the community children for a walk in the neighbourhood and collecting dry leaves, grass and twigs. You can celebrate the festival of lights by lighting a bonfire on the terrace or in an open space and serve homemade sweets and sherbet.
  • If you don't have the space for a bonfire, fill colourful balloons with glitter and small pieces of bright coloured paper. Spend the evening bursting them with your family and friends.
  • You could also opt for eco-friendly crackers that are made from recycled paper. The noise produced by these crackers is also within the decibel limits set by the Central Pollution Control Board.
  • Above all if you really want to burst crackers as an integral part of Diwali, limit your spends and enjoy less polluting crackers which are made in India.

Diwali marks the triumph of light over darkness, good over evil, and hope over despair.

So this Diwali be an unsung hero in bringing a change and pledge to celebrate Diwali responsibly and with minimal environmental consequence.

INTER ACTIVITY

WORD SEARCH PUZZLE

LAKSHMI, LAMP, SWEETS, GANESHA, RANGOLI, FIREWORKS, THALI, KARTIKA, FESTIVAL, CRACKERS, LIGHTS, HINDUISM, RAMA, GIFTS
Crossword

FIND THE DIFFERENCES

Find the Differences
Find the Differences

Spot 6 Differences in This Picture

BRAIN TEASERS

BRAIN TEASERS
BRAIN TEASERS

In Formation

PLACES TO BE PROUD OF IN INDIA

HIDDEN GEMS OF INDIA
HIDDEN GEMS OF INDIA -
PANCHA RATHAS

Pancha Rathas is a monument complex at Mahabalipuram, on the Coromandel Coast of the Bay of Bengal, in the Kancheepuram district of the state of Tamil Nadu, India. Pancha Rathas is an example of monolithic Indian rock-cut architecture. The complex was carved during the reign of King Narasimhavarman-I. The complex is under the auspices of the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) and is part of the UNESCO World Heritage site inscribed by UNESCO as Group of Monuments at Mahabalipuram.

Each of the five monuments in the Pancha Rathas complex resembles a chariot (ratha), and each is carved over a single, long stone or monolith, of granite which slopes in north-south direction with a slight incline. Though sometimes mistakenly referred to as temples, the structures were never made sacred because they were never completed following the death of Narasimhavarman-I. The structures are named after the Pancha Pandavas and their common wife Draupadi, of epic Mahabharata fame. In order of their size, they include the Dharmaraja Ratha, Bhima Ratha, Arjuna Ratha, Nakula Sahadeva Ratha, and Draupadi Ratha. The carvings and intricate architecture are impressive to view in person!

RECIPE

RECIPE

POMELO SALAD
Preparation Time: 10 Minutes

INGRIDIENTS:

  • 1 pomelo
  • 1 apple
  • Pomegranate
  • 2 teaspoons sugar powder
  • 1 and 1/2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 2 green chilli
  • 2 teaspoons chaat masala
  • 1 teaspoon mango powder
  • 1 teaspoon black salt
  • 1 teaspoon salt

PREPARATION:

Step 1:- Cut the Pomelo fruit into half and start peeling off the spongy fruit skin. After that just rip-off the spongy skin! The fruit flesh is hard and won’t get smashed. Once the skin is off take the fruits pocket apart and cut into pieces.

Step 2:- Cut apple into thin slices and peel pomegranate.

Step 3:- Mix all items (sugar, lemon juice, green chilli, chaat masala, dry mango powder, black salt & salt) for salad dressing and toss for a few number of times.

Step 3:-Salad is ready to serve.

FRUIT

FRUIT

POMELO or 'CHAKOTRA'

The healthy benefits of fruits cannot be ignored and when it comes to having a citrus fruit then the line is quiet long. One such fruit is Pomelo, scientifically also known as Citrus maxima because it is the largest citrus fruit. It is primarily cultivated in Southeast Asia, and in some parts of India like Assam, Uttarakhand, Kerala, Bangalore and Tripura. However, it is not famous in other parts of the world because it takes typically takes 8 years to grow before the seeds can begin to flower and bear any fruit.

The taste, however, is quite pleasant, without the tart or tangy flavor. Pomelo is usually pale green or yellow in color, while the edible flesh inside is pulpy and white, pink, or red, depending on the variety.

HEALTH BENIFITS:
  1. It aids in weight loss.
  2. Gives relief from cramps.
  3. Pomelo helps in Strengthening immune system.
  4. Helps in digestion and eliminates constipation.
  5. Reduces risk of atherosclerosis andheart attacks.
  6. Boots bone health and prevents osteoporosis.

INGLISH

WHY DO WE CALL राम AS RAMA IN ENGLISH?

Have you ever wondered why do we write ' राम ' as ' Rama ' and not ' Ram ' in English? If not then read on and enlighten yourself with some interesting facts and examples.

  • In Devanagri, Sandhi Viched of ' राम ' is र् + आ + म् + अ which in English becomes ' Rama ' because in Devanagri script the vowel ' अ ' is ' a ' in English.
    If we do not add ' a ' in English, then the word becomes Ram ie. ' राम् ' = र् + आ + म् which is incomplete.
    Hence, ' राम ' is र् + आ + म् + अ in Devanagri is ' Rama ' in English, which should be pronounced as ' राम ' not Rama.

  • Similarly, ' कृष्ण ' is क् + ृ + ष् + ण् + अ in Devanagri is Krishna in English, but should be pronounced as ' कृष्ण ' not Krishna.

  • In Devanagri, ' अर्जुन ' is अ + र् + ज + उ + न् + अ is Arjuna in English, but should be pronounced as ' अर्जुन ' not Arjuna.

  • Likewise, in Devanagri ' शिव ' is श् + इ + व् + अ is Shiva in English, but should be pronounced as ' शिव ' not Shiva.

ANSWERS

CROSSWORD
CROSSWORD
FIND THE DIFFERENCES
Find the Differences
BRAIN TEASERS
Ayush: Kartik.

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